RIAS BAIXAS (LOWER) AND THE RIVER MIÑO (LOWER)


RIAS BAIXAS (LOWER)

Bayona (Baiona)
village, is today one of the most thriving tourist resorts in the province of Pontevedra. During the low Middle Ages and the beginning of the Modern Era it was very important from a historic point of view. It was, in fact the first place in the Old World to learn of the discovery of America, since on April 1st 1493, the caravel Pinta put into port here following the historic voyage. Bayona has an outstanding monumental and artistic heritage. One of its most important constructions is the old Collegiate Church, which was completed during the latter half of the 13th c, and preserves certain similarities to the neighbouring church belonging to the Monastery of Oya (Oia). Inside can also be found a fine collection of guild marks. Mention should also be made of the Transept of La Trinidad (a late-Gothic work dating from around the end of the 15th c and the beginning of the 16th c), the Chapel of Santa Liberata (18th-c), and in particular Monte Real castle, which has been converted into a Parador. Outside the town we find the enormous Shrine of the Virgin of La Roca, a work that was carried out in 1910 following a design by Antonio Palacios.


Celtic Hill-Fort of Santa Tecla, is one of the castros of latest construction which has a larger surface. Even though it seems to have an uneven disposition, its constructions were perfectly distributed and small streets and squares were detected. It was one of the first discoveries in Galicia (1913). Next to the road leading up to the mountain, some of its constructions, restored in modern times, can be contemplated. Several objects -torques (ancient collars or necklaces worn worn by Romans), bracelets, ceramics or hand mills dating back to Roman and Pre-roman times- were found during the excavations. All these remains are kept in a small museum situated at the top of the path which leads up to the mountain.


Mount Santa Tecla, half way up, one of the first Celtic castros discovered in Galicia comes into view, and distributed along the mountain one can also find various rupestrian carvings. Once we reach the summit, there is a museum where personal adornments, ceramic and other objects found in the sites are kept. From the vantage point, one can actually enjoy the feeling of catching a glimpse of other continents


RIVER MIÑO (LOWER)

Tui has a legendary origin, explained by its privileged location on a hill and next to the Portuguese border by the River Miño. This has given the city a pattern of streets winding slowly and harmoniously down towards the river.

Tui Cathedral-Fortress, the cathedral was converted into a fortress studded with battlements, as a result of frequent invasions. It was begun in the 12th century in Romanesque style with influences from Compostela. This was then superseded by an early, French-inspired Gothic, the best example of which is the main façade. A spacious cloister was built in the southern part.


O Rosal valley, according to Fernández de la Granja, the origin of the name O Rosal (The Rosebush) dates from the Greek colonization, even though according to some authors its origin lies in the beauty of a rich, fertile valley. Paleolithic remains found in various lithic pieces have been discovered at Marzán, Torroso and As Eiras. Also some rests from the Bronze Age (1,900 to 600 BC.) and rupestrian carvings have been found. The castros, later Roman settlements, are present at places such as Pomba, Portela, O Picón and Calvario. San Vicente de Marzán was an important village within the context of Roman-mediaeval culture and it gathered the first Christianism signs in the municipality, as evidenced by San Vicente hermitage -documented as early as the 14th century. Carlos V granted it with the title of "Very Loyal Village" ("Muy Leal Villa") in return for the loyalty of its population in the revolts against the Comunidades. Apart from that, O Rosal's inhabitants also played an active role in the battles against Portugal.

Amongst its monuments, the Carmelitas convent, the House of Devea, San Antonio chapel and the Lasiotes' House stand out. O Rosal's physiognomy is distinguished by four different parts which cross it from river Carballo's fertile valley, through the shores covered by river Miño's fluvial terraces, the straight, inhospitable (3 metres long) coastline, up to the summits of the hills which protect Carballo valley eastward and westward. Grape vines and fruit trees are its most important sources of income, thanks to its climate. This area has made famous the mirabel (mock cypress), a fruit tree native of Central Europe, whose fruit -similar to the plum- is canned and commercialized in Galicia from this very land. O Rosal wines are also part of Galicia's wine selection. Corn and potatoes are its main crops. Porcine, bovine and poultry stock are the leading cattle varieties of a council that also has sheep, goats, horses and beehives. Despite being a wild littoral, there is some fishing complemented with the exploitation of the seaweed landing on these coasts. Trouts, eels, salmons and shads can be caught at river Miño. There is hardly any industry in the entire municipality, as a consequence of which most of its population works at Vigo-based enterprises.


River Miño is the most important one in Galicia and one of the Iberian Peninsula's main rivers, due to the extent of its basin, covering a surface of 22500 km2. It is a river of great regularity and high flow (242 m3/s). It flows into the Atlantic Ocean through A Guarda, where it delimits the lands of Spain and Portugal. Its waters travel 340 kilometres from its birthplace -Fontemiña, in the province of Lugo- before reaching the ocean. It crosses three out of the four Galician provinces, since its birth takes place in Lugo, passes through Orense and reaches in its last section the province of Pontevedra. The river is the natural border of the two latter provinces. River Sil is its main tributary, but it also receives numerous rivers in the course of its flow. Its most relevant tributaries in the province of Pontevedra are Deva and Barxa. River Miño becomes navigable in its last 40 km., from Salvaterra to its flowing into the Atlantic, in the municipalities of Camposancos and Caminha (in Portugal). Highly interesting animal and plant species populate this estuary

RIAS BAIXAS (LOWER) AND THE RIVER MIÑO (LOWER)


RIAS BAIXAS (LOWER)

Bayona (Baiona)
village, is today one of the most thriving tourist resorts in the province of Pontevedra. During the low Middle Ages and the beginning of the Modern Era it was very important from a historic point of view. It was, in fact the first place in the Old World to learn of the discovery of America, since on April 1st 1493, the caravel Pinta put into port here following the historic voyage. Bayona has an outstanding monumental and artistic heritage. One of its most important constructions is the old Collegiate Church, which was completed during the latter half of the 13th c, and preserves certain similarities to the neighbouring church belonging to the Monastery of Oya (Oia). Inside can also be found a fine collection of guild marks. Mention should also be made of the Transept of La Trinidad (a late-Gothic work dating from around the end of the 15th c and the beginning of the 16th c), the Chapel of Santa Liberata (18th-c), and in particular Monte Real castle, which has been converted into a Parador. Outside the town we find the enormous Shrine of the Virgin of La Roca, a work that was carried out in 1910 following a design by Antonio Palacios.


Celtic Hill-Fort of Santa Tecla, is one of the castros of latest construction which has a larger surface. Even though it seems to have an uneven disposition, its constructions were perfectly distributed and small streets and squares were detected. It was one of the first discoveries in Galicia (1913). Next to the road leading up to the mountain, some of its constructions, restored in modern times, can be contemplated. Several objects -torques (ancient collars or necklaces worn worn by Romans), bracelets, ceramics or hand mills dating back to Roman and Pre-roman times- were found during the excavations. All these remains are kept in a small museum situated at the top of the path which leads up to the mountain.


Mount Santa Tecla, half way up, one of the first Celtic castros discovered in Galicia comes into view, and distributed along the mountain one can also find various rupestrian carvings. Once we reach the summit, there is a museum where personal adornments, ceramic and other objects found in the sites are kept. From the vantage point, one can actually enjoy the feeling of catching a glimpse of other continents


RIVER MIÑO (LOWER)

Tui has a legendary origin, explained by its privileged location on a hill and next to the Portuguese border by the River Miño. This has given the city a pattern of streets winding slowly and harmoniously down towards the river.

Tui Cathedral-Fortress, the cathedral was converted into a fortress studded with battlements, as a result of frequent invasions. It was begun in the 12th century in Romanesque style with influences from Compostela. This was then superseded by an early, French-inspired Gothic, the best example of which is the main façade. A spacious cloister was built in the southern part.


O Rosal valley, according to Fernández de la Granja, the origin of the name O Rosal (The Rosebush) dates from the Greek colonization, even though according to some authors its origin lies in the beauty of a rich, fertile valley. Paleolithic remains found in various lithic pieces have been discovered at Marzán, Torroso and As Eiras. Also some rests from the Bronze Age (1,900 to 600 BC.) and rupestrian carvings have been found. The castros, later Roman settlements, are present at places such as Pomba, Portela, O Picón and Calvario. San Vicente de Marzán was an important village within the context of Roman-mediaeval culture and it gathered the first Christianism signs in the municipality, as evidenced by San Vicente hermitage -documented as early as the 14th century. Carlos V granted it with the title of "Very Loyal Village" ("Muy Leal Villa") in return for the loyalty of its population in the revolts against the Comunidades. Apart from that, O Rosal's inhabitants also played an active role in the battles against Portugal.

Amongst its monuments, the Carmelitas convent, the House of Devea, San Antonio chapel and the Lasiotes' House stand out. O Rosal's physiognomy is distinguished by four different parts which cross it from river Carballo's fertile valley, through the shores covered by river Miño's fluvial terraces, the straight, inhospitable (3 metres long) coastline, up to the summits of the hills which protect Carballo valley eastward and westward. Grape vines and fruit trees are its most important sources of income, thanks to its climate. This area has made famous the mirabel (mock cypress), a fruit tree native of Central Europe, whose fruit -similar to the plum- is canned and commercialized in Galicia from this very land. O Rosal wines are also part of Galicia's wine selection. Corn and potatoes are its main crops. Porcine, bovine and poultry stock are the leading cattle varieties of a council that also has sheep, goats, horses and beehives. Despite being a wild littoral, there is some fishing complemented with the exploitation of the seaweed landing on these coasts. Trouts, eels, salmons and shads can be caught at river Miño. There is hardly any industry in the entire municipality, as a consequence of which most of its population works at Vigo-based enterprises.


River Miño is the most important one in Galicia and one of the Iberian Peninsula's main rivers, due to the extent of its basin, covering a surface of 22500 km2. It is a river of great regularity and high flow (242 m3/s). It flows into the Atlantic Ocean through A Guarda, where it delimits the lands of Spain and Portugal. Its waters travel 340 kilometres from its birthplace -Fontemiña, in the province of Lugo- before reaching the ocean. It crosses three out of the four Galician provinces, since its birth takes place in Lugo, passes through Orense and reaches in its last section the province of Pontevedra. The river is the natural border of the two latter provinces. River Sil is its main tributary, but it also receives numerous rivers in the course of its flow. Its most relevant tributaries in the province of Pontevedra are Deva and Barxa. River Miño becomes navigable in its last 40 km., from Salvaterra to its flowing into the Atlantic, in the municipalities of Camposancos and Caminha (in Portugal). Highly interesting animal and plant species populate this estuary